UPC/EAN Barcode Generator

Value to encode:
Mode:
 
Sample

sample upc/ean barcode

Important Note for Windows users with Service Pack 2 installed
In Service Pack 2, Microsoft has blocked the type of image, XBM (X Bitmaps), that this UPC generator creates. Run this registry file to unblock XBM files.

You may have to close all Internet Explorer windows or restart your computer before the fix will take effect.

Notes

You may enter 7-, 8-, 12- or 13-digit barcodes. All forms support automatically calculating the final (checksum) digit. To do this, use a question mark instead of an actual digit, for example:

12345612345?
7681224?

The default mode, "UPC / EAN", attempts to DWIM ("do what I mean"): If you pass it 7 digits or 8 digits starting with the digit 0, then it will generate a UPC-E barcode. If you pass it 8 digits not starting with the digit 0, then it will generate an EAN-8 barcode. If you pass it 12 digits, then it will generate a UPC-A barcode. Finally, if you pass it 13 digits, then it will generate an EAN-13 barcode.

You can force 8 digits to be generated as EAN-8 by selecting the mode "EAN-8".

You can force generation of UPC-E by selecting the mode "UPC-E". In this mode, you may also pass 12 digits, instead of 7 or 8, which will get compressed into the UPC-E form if the form factor is correct. (See this description of UPC-E for more information.) For example, if you ask to encode "04432000008?", then the generated UPC-E will be for the number "04432841".

All UPC/EAN barcodes support a 2- or 5-digit supplemental code, which appears to the right of the main code. To produce such a barcode, place a comma and then the supplemental digits after the main number to encode, for example:

5553221?,76
9789862410035,90000

To change the banner over the barcode, place a colon and a new message after the barcode number, for example:

12349912:Hi Mom!
99994447327?:Yumminess

If you want to suppress the banner entirely, place a colon after the number but nothing else, as in:

6623919:
012345612345?:

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