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Tech Tip Tuesday: What Do I Need To Print Out Amazon Labels?

Posted March 20, 2018

Many merchants use Amazon as a platform to reach out to their customers. Each unit that you send to Amazon for fulfillment needs a scannable barcode to enable storage at their facility.

So what do you need to do to label your inventory for Amazon?

Amazon advised that you should,

  • Use a direct thermal printer with a print resolution of 300DPI or greater. (Each label must be readable and scannable for 24 months)
    Amazon fulfillment centers currently use the Zebra GX430t models with direct thermal setting. (More affordable and comparable option, Airtrack DP-1)

    • Labels to include
      1. Barcode
      Format: Code 128A
      Height: Greater than 0.25″ or 15% of barcode length
      Narrow Barcode element: For 300 dpi printers-3.33mils For 200 dpi printers-20mils
      Wide to Narrow Ratio: 3:1
      Quiet Zone (sides): Greater than 0.25″
      Quiet Zone (top and bottom): Greater than 0.125″
      2. FNSKU: Used by Amazon fulfillment centers to identify each unique product. To get the FNSKU, set the product as Fulfilled by Amazon, and then launch it to Amazon. Once the item is in your catalog in SellerCentral, Amazon will assign an FNSKU to the product.
      3. Title and Description
      4. Condition of the Unit
      5. Any Optional information to specify the product

Label Specifications require it to be printed on a white label and recommended to print on a dimension between 1×2″ and 2×3″ with a removable adhesive if directly on product. If you do not wish to label your own inventory, you can sign up for the FBA Label Service and have Amazon apply barcodes to your eligible items. (Per-item fee applies)

What about Shipment Labels?

Each box or pallet that you send to Amazon must be properly identified with a shipment label.

  • Labels supports the measures of 4×6″.
  • Don’t place labels on the seems of the box. (Might get cut by a box cutter which results into an unreadable barcode)
  • FBA shipment label should be placed next to the carrier label. Both needs to be uncovered for easy scanning.
  • Each box you include in the shipment must have its own label from the shipping Queue.
  • Each pallet needs four labels, one on top and the center of each visible sides.

For more in depth packaging and shipping instructions, please review this reference guide from Amazon.

Feel free to click on a few of our products that can help you create the labels you need for your business. If you have any needs or uncertainty, contact our dedicated account manager and they can help you pick the right equipment you need.

GX430t                                      DP-1                                   3×1″                                  4×6″

Tech Tip Tuesday: Labels!

Posted March 13, 2018

labels-1labels

How do you know what type of labels you will need?

There are a few things you want to check before you purchase labels.

  1. What type of printer are you using? Direct or Thermal Transfer? (Direct Thermal- heat transfer and Thermal Transfer is will require ribbons to transfer ink onto labels)
    Or if you have not chosen your printer yet, figure out how long do you need your labels to last and choose between direct or thermal transfer.
  2. Look at the maximum print width that your printer will print, have a plan on what size you want your labels to be. (For example: 3×1 will be 3inches across and 1 inch tall) Normally, sizes for shipping labels will be 4×6 and shelf labels will be 2×1 or 3×1.
  3. Print Material– The main type of print material revolves around three and it’s mostly paper, polypropylene, or polyester.
    Paper- $, used mostly indoor and max lifetime is 5-7 months
    Polypropylene(paper and plastic texture)- $$, can be used indoor and outdoor and max life time is 2 years
    Polyester(plastic texture)- $$$, used indoor or outdoor, gloss on label, scratch/smear, and water resistant and max life time is 3 years
  4. Below are the sizes of the label cores that you have to confirm before purchase, just to make sure it will fit inside your printer. (Often times this is the step that most people overlook and realize that the roll won’t fit when it arrives. So keeping note now will prevent any mis-order in the future)
    Desktop Printers: (core in diameter)
    Inner Core: 1 inch              Outer Core: 5 inches
    Industrial Printers:
    Inner Core: 3 inches          Outer Core: 8 inches
    Mobile Printers:
    Varies

Take a look at some of the labels that we have available for desktop, industrial, and mobile printers. If you are still unsure about the type of labels you need, feel free to contact one of our dedicated account managers and they can help you find the type of labels you need.

Tech Tip Tuesday: What Do I Need To Print Out My Barcodes?

Posted March 6, 2018

Following up on the last tech tip Tuesday, now that you have figured out how to get your own barcodes it is time to print them out. So what do you need to print out the barcodes?

Barcodes.
First, you have to design and create the barcodes in a barcode software. A few that we suggest is Bartender by Seagull Scientific, Nice Label, or Teklynx. These software allow you to design your label and barcodes to hold the info that you need.
The next thing you have to do is to choose a printer that suitable for your need. Below are the printer size we recommend, depending on how many labels you print out in a day and what size do you want your labels to be.

Printers.
Direct Thermal– chemically treated label is heated directly (short-term life on label) Usually used on shipping packages.
Thermal Transfer– ribbon ink is transferred onto the label (will stay on longer on label) Usually used on warehouse/retail store racks.

Desktop Printer– This type of printer, like the GX420t, is made for small volume applications. Usage is suitable for about 300-500 labels per week. It is perfect for asset labeling in an office or light printing duties at a retail store.
Industrial Printer It is larger and more rugged than desktop models for high volume print applications, like the Datamax I-4212e. Usage is suitable for printing thousands of labels per day. It is great for manufacturing and distribution centers as well as large retailers.
Mobile Printer– This type of printer provides mobility to users, like the Zebra QLn320. It’s small existence allows users to print on the go and perfect for delivery drivers and field workers to create label or receipt.

If you have any questions about what kind of software and printer that you should use, feel free to contact our dedicated account managers and they will be able to provide you with the best solution for your application.

gk420d-2

Tech Tip Tuesday: How To Barcode Your Product

Posted February 20, 2018

To barcode your own product, there’s a few steps you should follow. First, determine if you need an unique barcode number for your product. If you do, follow the steps below to learn what you need in order to get your product out the door. Once you have the barcode, contact one of our dedicated account managers to find the printer and supplies that’s suitable to your need and get started on printing your own.

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Tech Tip Tuesday: Honeywell’s Xenon 1902 Trigger Function

Posted February 6, 2018

Here at Barcodes Inc, we want to share on tips on how to configure your product. Every Tuesday we will share a tip on a product so you can have the knowledge on how to use your new scanner.

The Honeywell’s Xenon 1902 series delivers a superior barcode scanning and digital image capture. Whether you want to use it in retail or at a health care environment. There’s two ways to scan with the the barcode scanner, a normal mode (press trigger to read) or a presentation mode (the scanner is activated when it sees a barcode). The presentation mode is usually being used with the stand to hold the scanner and for products to be scanned right below it.

In order for you to switch between the two modes, here are barcodes that you can print and scan to change the setting.

 

 

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