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Intermec Launcher Now Available for the CV61

Posted November 20, 2012

Intermec CV61 TerminalIntermec has announced the availability of their Launcher application  for all versions of the Intermec CV61 fixed vehicle-mount computer. Intermec Launcher provides enterprises with the ability to manage their operators’ access to the underlying operating system and all of the functionality that it provides. Intermec Launcher is ideal for enterprises that have a few line-of-business applications which operators need to access, but who do not want to allow potentially distracting applications to be run on their mobile computers.

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Intermec Introduces the New CK3X and CK3R Mobile Computers

Posted October 30, 2012


CK3X and CK3R Deliver Industry-Leading Performance, Best-in-Class Battery Life and an Easy Migration Option from Intermec’s Popular CK3B

Intermec has announced the Next Generation CK3 Series of rugged mobile computers, offering one of the industry’s highest performing mobile computing options to date. For use in distribution center, manufacturing and retail operations, the CK3 Next Generation Series is comprised of two models – the CK3X and CK3R – which utilize a 1GHZ OMAP architecture to optimize workforce performance through industry-leading battery life, enhanced barcode scanning, superior device health monitoring and broad compliance for emerging industry standards such as HTML5.

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Just the Ticket – Sand Springs Police Department Increases Productivity and Safety with the Intermec CN50

Posted October 10, 2012

Intermec CN50 Mobile ComputerTo serve and protect is just one of the many things the Sand Springs Police Department (SSPD) is tasked with on a daily basis. As the department’s officers report to work each day, citations are just one of the many ways they keep their population of 19,000 safe. But beyond safety, citations are also a way the city generates revenue.

Previously relying on an outdated manual process, officers would complete a hand-written five-carbon copy citation. The violator would get one copy, and the rest would be distributed to various police, court and city personnel for repeated entry into multiple other computer systems. This process caused a lot of redundancy, administrative time and wasted effort, as citations were often lost in the shuffle or dismissed due to illegibility – causing citation revenue to go uncollected.

In short, SSPD looked for a technology solution that would offer increased officer productivity and an improvement in officer safety by getting them off the roadside faster.

The answer? An eCitation solution coupled with the Intermec CN50 rugged handheld mobile computers.

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Intermec Offers Industry’s Most Flexible HTML5 Capable Browser for Select Intermec Rugged Mobile Computers

Posted September 26, 2012

Intermec announced a new HTML5-capable browser, allowing for the development of OS agnostic web applications that can run on iOS, Android and select Intermec rugged mobile computers, enhancing workflow efficiency and offering increased flexibility to mobile workforces.

Unique to the industry, Intermec’s HTML5 offering includes a true web browser application, based on WebKit, for multiple models of Intermec’s handheld computers for Windows Mobile and Windows Embedded operating systems. Additionally, Intermec’s HTML5-capable browser supports applications designed to run either on-line (connected to a web server), off-line (no connection to a web server) or a combination of the two.

Intermec’s HTML5 browser for Windows Embedded Handheld is not only built on the state-of-the-art Webkit engine, like iOS and Android, but it is offered conveniently preloaded and free of licensing fees or license activation requirements on Intermec CN50CS40CN70CN70e and CK70, and is available for free download for the CK3CK71 and CV41. HTML5 applications that run on consumer-grade smartphones and tablets can now also be run on these select Intermec rugged mobile computers without changes or rewrites.

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Intermec PM43c Now Shipping

Posted September 11, 2012

Intermec PM43c Barcode PrinterThe Intermec PM43c industrial mid-range printer, a compact version of the PM43, is available for orders and is now shipping.

The PM Series are shipping with multi-command language firmware that includes Fingerprint and Direct Protocol, IPL and competitive emulations for ZPLII and DPL. While customers can take advantage of the ease of use provided by multi-command language firmware, only Fingerprint and Direct Protocol offers the most features and best performance: fastest throughput, easiest configuration, wizards and tools, XML, and Smart Printing and INprint for printing without a host application. Fingerprint and Direct Protocol is recommended for all new applications and current custom applications where a change is possible.

The full-sized PM43 is a direct replacement for the PM4i, and the compact PM43c directly replaces the PF4i industrial printer

For more information or to order a new PM43c feel free to contact us at Barcodes Inc.


A Guide to Smart Printing

Posted August 16, 2012

Understanding the Capabilities, Use Cases and Advantages of Smart Printers

Businesses are continually looking for ways to work smarter. Printing operations provide an excellent – and often overlooked – opportunity. One growing trend among companies with bar code printing operations is to leverage the capabilities of “smart” printers, which are printers that integrate the power of a personal computer. Smart printers enable businesses to change the way their printing operations are structured, to streamline and improve processes in ways that reduce operating costs while improving reliability.

Smart printing takes advantage of the memory and processing power available in advanced printers to run printing operations independently, without a PC or network connection to another host computer. Smart printers can run software applications and can function as PLCs to control other devices, including scales, scanners and label applicators. By using the computing power that’s in the printer, organizations can reduce their IT hardware, networking and support requirements, lower the total cost of printing operations, and create work processes that improve productivity and reduce opportunities for errors.

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Five Things to Consider When Using Tablet Computers in Forklift Applications

Posted July 31, 2012

fotoWhy Tablets and Purpose Built Forklift-Mounted Computers Are Not Interchangeable

Tablet computing is one of the fastest-growing categories of consumer electronics and enterprise IT alike. The buzz is leading many businesses to explore new uses for tablet computers, and some are finding their way into evaluation trials on forklifts and other vehicle applications in the distribution center. With their large screens and available Windows operating systems, tablets can seem quite similar to the forklift-mounted computers that are widely used today. They can also be taken off the forklift and used on the floor, which some organizations find intriguing.

However, tablets should not be considered drop-in replacements for purpose-built forklift mounted terminals because there are several major differences between the product categories. If you are considering using tablet computers on forklifts, it is important to know these differences and how they may impact operations. Careful evaluation will highlight compromises in integration and everyday use.

This post reviews some of the important differences between tablets and purpose-built computers for forklifts, and presents the five key issues that must be considered when assessing tablet computers for forklift operators:

  • Is the design and mounting appropriate for a warehouse or distribution center environment?
  • How will the tablet be powered from the forklift?
  • Is the tablet compatible with data collection equipment(scanners, printers, RFID), legacy warehouse management system (WMS), fleet management solutions and other critical enterprise systems?
  • How will tablets impact user processes and productivity?
  • How much will tablets really cost?

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Future Proofing Your Mobile Computers

Posted July 16, 2012

How the Features You Select Now Can Protect & Extend Your Investment Years into the Future

Rugged mobile computers deployed to warehouses, DCs and other transportation and distribution environments often aren’t used as long as expected, and as result cost the organization more than expected. Companies typically replace their DC computers after about 3 1/2 years, which is approximately seven months sooner than planned at the start of the deployment, according to a study. Rugged devices can actually last even longer, but are retired prematurely because the processors, software, communications data capture capabilities contained within the rugged housing are considered inefficient or obsolete.

Extending service life increases the value of mobile computers. When life cycles go down, so does the return on investment, and the total cost of ownership (TCO) goes up. The table below illustrates how changes in the replacement cycle impact the TCO for mobile computing deployments. It reflects how much the purchase price of a $3,000 rugged computer used in warehousing and distribution contributes to the annual and monthly TCO. Note that replacing mobile computers after 31/2 years instead of four (which is about the average intended life cycle) increases the annual TCO allocation by $107, or 14.2 percent.

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Smart Printers. Smart Investment.

Posted July 10, 2012

People generally relate to industrial printers as they do to their desktop printers. It’s a “dumb” device that prints whatever a computer sends it. As long as it does that well and keeps working, people really don’t think too much about it.

Bar code printers have generally fallen into the same “dumb” and reliable category, but are also rugged and fast at producing labels.

However, there is a different type of industrial-strength printer that’s in a class by itself. It has the same characteristics as other bar code printers—rugged, fast, and reliable—but these printers are “smart.” Smart printers have built-in intelligence that enables them to perform a wide variety of operations that normal printers cannot.

First, smart printers do not require a computer to be able to produce labels. The immediate benefits are you save the cost of a computer dedicated to controlling the printer and you save space by reducing the number of devices needed to perform operations. Smart printers’ intelligence also allows them to actually run processes and devices. Smart printers can act as programmable logic controllers (PLC) to run other devices in production applications.

Smart printers are not new; they have been manufactured for over a decade. The latest generation delivers even more capability than before, adding advanced bar code printing capabilities, errorproofing, the ability to print directly from ERP systems via XML data, and RFID labeling and data management capabilities.

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How e-Citation Systems Increase Productivity & Revenues While Improving Officer Safety

Posted June 29, 2012

Electronic citation (e-Citation) systems represent one of the most succcessful uses of mobile and wireless technology in public safety operations. Electronic citation systems have earned high user satisfaction ratings from state highway patrol agencies, police departments, parking authorities and campus security organizations across the country because of their well-proven ability to save time for officers, improve safety while issuing tickets, reduce errors and illegible tickets, and improve collection rates.

The only significant obstacles to more widespread use of electronic citation systems are insufficient awareness, understanding and budgets. This white paper will provide the background information needed to pursue an e-Citation initiative, plus benefit data and tips to help win funding for it.

e-Citations in Action

The Snohomish County (WA) Sheriff’s Office experience with electronic citation systems is typical. Deputies in the traffic unit each used to write about 12 to 15 paper citations a day. Each citation took four to five minutes to write, and a similar amount of time back at headquarters to enter into the computer system. With 20 traffic deputies working on a typical day, the sheriff’s office collectively spent between 43 and 47.5 hours daily writing and entering citations.

Snohomish County switched to creating citations on handheld computers, which produce a copy for the offender on a vehicle mounted printer and automatically download the citation information to the headquarters computer system without manual data entry. Productivity – and citation revenue – have since soared.

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