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Code Releases The New CR2600

Posted August 3, 2012

Code Corporation announced the launch of the Code Reader 2600 (CR2600). The CR2600 introduces new high performance bar code reading technologies which results in unequaled, unmatched bar code reading performance.

With an aggressive scan engine, the CR2600 decodes 1D and 2D bar codes faster and features patented technologies including dual field optics and glare reducing technology. The CR2600 is available in both palm and handled configurations, and features durable quick-release, rechargeable, battery cartridges. The newly designed battery cartridge accurately measures charge level and displays battery life using a fuel gauge indicator.

The disinfectant ready housing and IP65 sealing of the CR2600 prevents plastic degradation and securely protects electronics and optics. The CR2600 is both rugged and durable and ideal for applications in 24/7, 365, high traffic environments such as healthcare, retail, and manufacturing

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CipherLab Presents a New Bluetooth 2D Barcode Scanner from the Antimicrobial Protection Series

Posted June 5, 2012

CipherLab, a leading innovator in Automated Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) has released the 1664H scanner from its Antimicrobial Protection Series today. This model is designed to meet conditions in the healthcare application. It comes with unique disinfection friendly treatment which will not scrub off with alcohol cleaning, also protects the product from bacteria growth in clinical settings. Its lightweight features make it easy to carry and give users excellent mobility.

The 1664H pocket-sized scanner is designed to perfectly supplement the healthcare staffs. Alongside of the special antimicrobial technology, the 1664H is equipped with 4 MB memory for spacious data storage. In terms of scanning capabilities, the 1664H satisfies the growth of 2D barcodes deployments as well as those with 1D barcodes. It operates on a rechargeable Li-ion battery which translates to long operational time creating increased productivity. Armed with Bluetooth technology, the scanner supports a wide working range for instant data synchronization with the back-end system.

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Pharmacy Pill Bottle Labeling

Posted April 26, 2012

Industry Need

Advancements in pharmaceutical science enable improved health, better management of medical conditions, and even extended life spans for many. However, realization of these benefits relies on accurate identification of medicines and dosing instructions; mistakes can have severe health repercussions. Specialized pill bottle labels fulfill this critical identification and information role.

Pharmaceutical labeling has a unique set of product requirements. Durability is key. Frequent handling, contact abrasion (such as jostling with purse contents), or storage in warm, moist environments must not degrade the printed image or adhesion. Many common label materials are quickly degraded by contact with hand lotions or other environmental exposures.

Pharmaceuticals are typically fulfilled through two channels, each of which contributes additional unique requirements.

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CipherLab’s New Antimicrobial Protection Series Brings More Efficiency to Healthcare Providers

Posted April 10, 2012

Fulfilling not only the needs for a sanitary environment, the 8200H also offers long lasting performance and ergonomic comfort.

CipherLab, a well-known manufacturer in the field of Automated Identification and Data Capture (AIDC), announced today a new addition to its antimicrobial protection series – the 8200H mobile computer. It comes with a built-in antimicrobial treatment to meet the standard requirements of healthcare providers, and offers various reader options including 2D imager in response to the growing adoption of 2D barcodes on the medicine packaging and patient’s wristband.

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Labeling Solutions for the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries

Posted April 9, 2012

Industry Need

The Health Industry Business Communications Council and the American National Standards Institute have developed the ANSI/HIBC standards for packed and item level bar coding for the health care industry. Bar code technology is a proven valuable tool for reducing labor costs, human error and automating data to improve the quality of patient care. Standards for proper identification can be found at http://www.hibcc.org.  Analytical diagnosis begins with specimen analysis in laboratories that submit samples to extreme conditions such as centrifugal separation, cryogenic freezing or autoclave sterilization.

Extreme applications have been at the core of Intermec’s business since the development of the bar code, with solutions ranging from pharmaceutical clean rooms designed for temporary ID to durable military code applications for transcontinental deployment.

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Mobile Medical Sample Labeling

Posted April 3, 2012

Industry Need

Medical testing provides key information to physicians, serving as a foundational tool for diagnosing patient conditions. Accuracy is critically important; mistakes can lead to undiagnosed illnesses or inappropriate treatments. Current specimen vial labeling methods, however, are error-prone. Handwritten labels are subject to interpretation and manual data errors; labels preprinted at a central station and carried to the patient location introduce the chance for mix-ups. Mobile sample labeling eliminates these opportunities for errors, enhancing patient safety. Printing on Intermec media ensures robust traceability, meeting the application requirements of sample labeling from the point of collection through challenging laboratory conditions.

Automatic identification technologies such as bar coding excel at eliminating human error. Within the high-touch medical environment these systems have steadily improved patient safety. Errors resulting from manual data entry are unacceptable in a diagnostic environment where they can lead to lost samples (increasing time to diagnose and treat) or mistaken patient identities (potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis and course of treatment).

Recognizing the persistence of these errors, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has made improving the accuracy of patient identification the first goal of the 2010 National Patient Safety Goals document. This goal requires blood and specimen containers to be labeled in the patient’s presence. Printing sample labels in place and on-demand with ID scanned from the patient’s wristband eliminates multiple points of error, enhancing patient safety.

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Medical Wristbands

Posted March 27, 2012

Industry Need

Effective patient care is predicated on accuracy, but human error is exceptionally difficult to eliminate in the inherently high-touch medical environment. To address this, barcodes and automatic ID technologies are being used increasingly across a wide range of medical practices. Patient wristbands are one common application area. Intermec patient wristbands ensure positive identification for integration with verification systems for medication, samples, and surgical procedures.

The five rights of medication safety (right patient, right drug, right time, right dose, right route) provide an important framework for verification of pharmaceutical administration, but commonly rely on manual human checks. Integration of positive patient ID with barcode wristbands provides a highly reliable adjunct to eliminate human error. With increasing implementation of patient electronic medical record (EMR), scanning the wristband can trigger caregiver notification of allergies or other special requirements.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has made improving the accuracy of patient identification a high priority, and it remains the number one goal in the pre-release version of the 2010 National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs) for hospitals. Recognizing the accuracy enhancements of auto ID technologies, bar code verification is specifically cited as an acceptable alternative to resourceintensive two-person verification required for administration of blood products.

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Healthcare Unique Device Identification (UDI) Labeling

Posted March 27, 2012

Industry Need

The FDA’s developing UDI (Unique Device Identification) standard highlights the capacity of auto-ID technologies to enable significant improvements in patient safety. Quick, effective recalls and adverse event reporting are difficult with current medical device management systems, and UDI is targeted to drive major enhancements. Pushing traceability to the device level enables manufacturers and users to quickly identify, locate, and pull recalled units from service; connecting adverse events to a unit serial number can reveal failure trends previously missed with manual checks.

The FDA is developing the unique attributes with input from the GHTF (Global Harmonization Task Force) for Automatic Data Collection of the device’s lot and serial number to maintain a chain of custody record for the life cycle of the Medical Device.

Additional benefits to full implementation include accurate device usage data yielding improved maintenance effectiveness. Direct input of device usage into electronic health records can provide significantly increased accuracy of patient service history and billing. Selecting the correct printers and media help ensure UDI labeling delivers the intended benefits in challenging healthcare environments.

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Cryogenic Sample Tracking

Posted March 26, 2012

Industry Need

Modern life sciences commonly require long term preservation of biological material; cryogenic processing and storage provides a means to this end. With a large quantity of small samples in storage, accurate tracking is critical. Barcoded labels (with linear or 2D symbols) are the preferred method, but the extreme environmental stresses can cause failure with standard media.

Cryogenic conditions have become commonplace in multiple applications, ranging from pharmaceutical processing to lyophilization of vaccines. Cryopreservation of tissues and cell suspensions in small vials provides its own set of challenges, requiring conformability to small diameter surfaces and adhesion to low surface energy plastics such as polypropylene and polyethylene. Increasingly common cryogenic shipping of vaccines, tissues, and medicines in liquid nitrogen with temperatures as low as -112°F /-80°C now subjects a greater range of barcoded items to these stresses.

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Real-Time Asset Tracking Drives Emergency Care Goals at Washington Hospital Center

Posted March 23, 2012

Unprecedented Insight Enables More Informed Decisions and Better Patient Care

About Washington Hospital Center

Washington Hospital Center, with 926 beds, is the largest private hospital in the nation’s capital. It’s also now ranked first among all 57 hospitals in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan region by U.S. News & World Report, recognized for its heart surgery, endocrine disorders, geriatrics and ear, nose and throat care. The not-for-profit hospital is a member of MedStar Health system and shares a 47-acre campus with three medical facilities in Northwest Washington, D.C.

Challenge

In 1998, three years before the Sept. 11 attack on the Pentagon, Washington Hospital Center began proactively looking at how to improve patient care in the emergency room. To that end, the hospital secured a federal grant to evaluate how to design emergency medicine for the future.

When the Pentagon was hit, bringing all seriously injured patients to Washington Hospital Center, the event reinforced the commitment to enhancing every aspect of the emergency care experience. The center sought to answer, how does ER medicine need to evolve to address major events like Sept. 11, bombings or Metro system accidents?

Today, the initiative has grown into the ER One Center for Building Science, under the MedStar Institute for Innovation. Specifically, a think tank of physicians, nurses, architects, researchers and others consider how building design, from flooring to lighting, can influence healthcare.

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