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Code’s CR4300: Barcode Reading in a Whole New Light

Posted March 22, 2018

As the mobile world continues to grow there have been many solutions that help equip mobile devices with barcode reading capabilities. The Code Reader 4300 (CR4300) is revolutionizing how those mobile devices become enterprise-grade data capture devices without the size, weight, expense, and power draw of traditional scan engine modules. The CR4300 takes the camera from an iPod or iPhone and combines it with a patented optical platform and 2D Revolution, Code’s world-class decoding software, to create a user-friendly, high-performance barcode reader. By eliminating the scan engine module, the CR4300 is a departure from traditional barcode reader sleds.

Not only can the CR4300 easily read some of the toughest 1D and 2D barcodes it provides a protective case to keep mobile devices safe in a variety of environments. The CR4300 also comes with a 3,000 mAh back-up battery to keep the iPod or iPhone charged and running on long shifts. The lightweight design, 10.1 oz (0.63 lbs), is durable and has a disinfectant-ready case built for environments like healthcare, point-of-sale, event management, inventory, field services, and many more applications. Comes with a built-in gauge to keep users informed of battery status and can be charged quickly via USB or multi-bay drop in charger.

CR4300 Features and Benefits:

  • Streamlines mobile barcode reading by using iPhone/iPod camera.
  • Provides clear targeting and convenient scan buttons so users can scan quickly.
  • Keeps mobile devices running with 3000 mAh battery backup.
  • Informs users of battery status with built-in gauge.
  • Protects iPhone/iPod with durable, disinfectant-ready case.
  • Charges quickly via USB or with drop-in, multi-bay charger.


Microscan Announces the Release of WebLink 1.1 and New Features for MicroHAWK Barcode Readers

Posted July 13, 2016

Microscan has announced the release of WebLink 1.1 – the latest version of the world’s first web-based barcode reader setup and control interface – supporting several new feature upgrades for the company’s MicroHAWK Barcode Reader platform.

Part of the revolutionary MicroHAWK platform launched in September 2015, Microscan introduced WebLink as the first ever web-based barcode reader interface. WebLink software is stored on the MicroHAWK barcode reader, rather than external equipment. The WebLink interface is accessed through a web browser by navigating to the barcode reader’s IP address using any web-enabled device on the local area network (LAN). WebLink’s open protocol framework eliminates integration hassle and device incompatibility across factory networks, IT equipment, and control systems. Since no software is installed on equipment used to control MicroHAWK readers, WebLink does not require the intervention of IT to facilitate installation or upgrades. In addition, custom reader settings can be saved as WebLink job files to the MicroHAWK reader’s internal memory or to external devices and are completely portable to new integration environments and equipment.

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The Most Common Causes of Unreadable Barcodes

Posted July 15, 2015

image012Item identification and data acquisition through barcodes is critical to the function of automated operations, from ensuring that the correct components are used in the assembly of a smart phone to recording accurate patient data for samples in a laboratory. When poorly-marked or damaged barcodes result in “no-reads” or failures, loss of data can have disastrous effects on product integrity and corporate reputation – not to mention potential legal implications and serious risks to consumer welfare. Understanding the root cause of unreadable barcodes and using technology appropriately to prepare for or resolve these issues is simple to do and it can mean the difference between success and failure in automation. This white paper describes potential solutions for the most common causes of unreadable barcodes, including:

  • Low Contrast
  • Quiet Zone Violations
  • Improper Reading Position
  • Print or Mark Inconsistency
  • Damage or Distortion

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Cognex DataMan 8050 Provides High Performance Scanning at an Affordable Cost

Posted February 13, 2014

New DataMan 8050 Handheld Barcode Readers Expand the Applications for DataMan

Cognex, the world’s leader in machine vision, has announced the release of its fastest and most economical industrial handheld readers yet, the DataMan 8050 Series. Designed with a ruggedized housing to handle harsh factory floor conditions and equipped with Cognex’s world-class barcode reading algorithms, the DataMan 8050 Series can read even challenging barcodes quickly and easily.

High-speed performance, even with the most challenging barcodes 

The patent-pending DataMan 8050 and 8050X are ideal for applications in many manufacturing environments, such as automotive, consumer electronics, aerospace and packaging. The DataMan 8050 and 8050X utilize Cognex’s patented 1DMax+ with Hotbars algorithms to provide high-speed reading performance even with damaged, low contrast or direct inkjet barcodes. Our industry-leading 2-D algorithms allow the 8050 to rapidly decode a variety of 2-D symbologies, including DataMatrix, QR, PDF417 and Aztec codes.

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Code Introduces New Bluetooth Barcode Reader Product with Bluetooth Interface Adapted for Retail Markets

Posted November 20, 2013

Code CR2300 ScannerCode, an industry leader of advanced, image-based barcode readers, has recently expanded their product line with the addition of the Code Reader 2300 (CR2300).

The CR2300 is a high-performance, Bluetooth barcode reader designed for use in retail environments. The image-based device is easy to use and features a robust decoding engine that provides omnidirectional barcode reading and high-speed data output. The reliability and aggressive data collection capabilities of the CR2300 are crucial components for retailers committed to enhancing customer experiences by reducing lines and wait times at check-out counters.

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