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Motorola Enterprise Wireless Access Points – Infographic

Posted December 30, 2013

Wireless access has become such a common utility today that businesses and customers find it strange when basic Wi-Fi isn’t available or not capable of supporting many of the apps we use on a daily basis. With the constantly evolving wireless standards, choosing the right access point can be the difference between getting reliable and consistent service or a world of frustration.

Motorola is a leading manufacture of access points and its current product line provides the most current capabilities like 802.11AC, advanced security options, and designs for outdoor, warehouse, and even retail applications.  This infographic is a quick overview of the various access points Motorola produces and their key features.

MOTOROLA ENTERPRISE WIRELESS ACCESS POINTS


Sato’s 802.11g Wireless Interface Update

Posted February 7, 2013

SATO CL408e Barcode PrinterSATO continues to update the 802.11g wireless interface to support the latest WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access 2) standards. This enhancement is available for both existing and new 802.11g WLAN plug-in interface option for SATO “e” series tabletop and print engine models, as well as the SATO CT4i and MBi series WLAN printer models.

SATO’s 802.11g WLAN interface provides enhanced security for those who need to ensure their wireless infrastructure and security protocols are able to integrate seamlessly with SATO printers. The SATO 802.11g WLAN option enables SATO printers to support the same speed and security that companies invested in when selecting 802.11g equipment for their networks. The SATO 802.11g interface supports WEP, and WPA/WPA2-Enterprise standards to ensure maximum data security.  Such enterprise-level security platforms enable SATO 802.11g wireless radio to support a variety of mobile applications, including point of sale, price markdowns, warehouse/logistics labeling, and more.

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The Importance of Enhanced Security and Encryption Protocols for Wireless Hardware

Posted September 17, 2012

In the storefront, at the office, throughout the warehouse, and on the road, wireless technology is a critical tool for conducting and improving business. Yet, despite its ubiquitous presence in business, we still read, almost daily, about hackers breaking into large network databases—heightening concerns about identity theft and credit card fraud. Security risks associated with wireless networks have forced businesses to comply with new, more stringent regulations for network security and data encryption. This document outlines the risks your wireless network faces and summarizes current state-of-the-art wireless hardware security systems. It also highlights critical factors to consider when selecting hardware partners to protect your future investment in wireless technology.

The Business Case for Wireless

The use of 802.11 wireless devices has been a driving force in the advance of worker efficiency. It has also brought higher levels of service to retail and commercial customers alike. The unassailable benefits of wireless devices are driving the growth of 802.11 technology. According to the Wi-Fi Alliance, chipsets sold on an annual basis to support wireless technology will grow to one billion units by 2012 (Ref. ABI Research). Clearly, companies that ignore the value of wireless technology will be left behind as their competitors benefit from its many advantages. However, the use of wireless technology is not without risks, and astute companies will take measures to mitigate these risks before wholly embracing wireless devices.

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Choosing the Right Connectivity

Posted June 7, 2012

”Always connected” was a phrase without meaning 20 years ago; today, being always connected is a necessity. Enterprises of every type know they need employees with more mobility – and more connectedness – than ever to grow their businesses and remain competitive. But which type of wireless technology to use is difficult to determine. This paper examines the wireless options for mobile computer connectivity and takes a close look at some nontraditional choices that can save you money while still delivering improved productivity.

Communicating within four walls usually relies on 802.11a/b/g/n (also called Wi-Fi or WLAN for wireless local-area networks). Going outside the four walls requires other technology, typically wireless widearea networks (WWAN) or satellite. Each has strengths and weaknesses.

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