The Barcode Experts. Low Prices, Always.


What You Need in a Mobile Business

Posted January 5, 2018

Food-truckPop-up retail and mobile food trucks isn’t new. It is a secret weapon that small business owners use to get their product out into the world and into the hands of their customers. In the pop up world, business owners will find a venue like a coffee shop, store, craft fair, or farmer’s market, then set up a retail or food shop for a limited of time: anything from one day to a few weeks.

This is an opportunity for VARs to serve a growing trend, particularly because of the mobility and connectivity to customers are key for business owners running pop up shops.

What’s the point in pop-up?

Mobile locations are more flexible for entrepreneurs looking to grow a brand and gain funding without risking everything on their venture.

  • It’s authentic. Business owners are standing behind the customers, answering questions, building credibility, and connecting with the customer.
  • It’s special. The pop-up won’t be there forever, the perfect time for an impulse purchase.
  • It’s affordable. Your expenses are low, so you can just focus on the price points.
  • It’s mobile. Businesses travel to their customers, which is a great way to test the viability of a new business or a way to expand an existing business in a new location.

Solutions for a Pop- Up:

Pop-Up shops are becoming an accessible venture for many owners to expand on their current businesses without needing to fully commit to purchasing a location. Popular restaurants can simply park their food truck near a sporting event or music festival and capitalize on an event even if their actual location is far away.

Check out the solutions we have available for a pop-up. Feel free to contact one of our dedicated account managers if you have any questions to pick out the tools you will need in your mobile business.


Into the Cold: Cold Storage Mobile Computers

Posted November 22, 2017

Warm garments are essential for warehouse workers to perform daily operations in the cold, the same goes for mobile computers. Mobile computers must be built to perform under these demanding condition.

Moving a standard mobile computer in and out between normal and cold areas is extremely hard on the device even if it’s ruggedized. Short term: the LCD screen fogs up, batteries won’t release enough energy and processors may not perform optimally. Long term: Screens and housing will become brittle and repeated condensation can cause internal components to corrode, short-circuit, and fail.

If you work in an environment that is typically exposed to cold temperatures, consider the devices below:

Motorola‘s Omnii XT15f Mobile Computer
Omnii XT15

  • Lorax Scanner
  • 1/2D options
  • 11 a/b/g
  • Bluetooth
  • Windows CE 6.0
  • Condensation Resistant Chiller Model is built for -4º F / -20º C
  • Condensation Free Arctic Model is built for -22º F / -30º C
  • Screen defroster option


Honeywell’s CK75 Cold Storage Mobile Computer


  • Cold storage
  • Windows or Android OS option
  • Standard or extended range scanner
  • 11 a/b/g/n
  • 2D scanner (scans both 1D and 2D)
  • Standard Unit is built for -4º F / -20º C
  • Cold Storage Unit is built for -22º F / -30º C

Thriving in cold conditions requires the ability to adapt to the environment. Being prepared with the right resources and equipment can lower operating costs by increasing productivity and decrease equipment down time.

For any questions or a quote on any of your mobile computing needs contact us at Barcodes, Inc

KoamTac’s New KDC20 Miniature Bluetooth Laser Barcode Scanner

Posted May 21, 2014

KDC20KoamTac has announced the release of its new KDC20 miniature laser barcode scanner at CONNECT 2014, KoamTac’s annual partner conference. The KDC20 is the companys most cost-efficient, stand-alone Bluetooth scanner. Equipped with a convenient swing-out USB connector, the scanner conserves consumer resources by eliminating cables and enabling the use of off-the-shelf multi-USB charging solutions.

Highly configurable, the new device includes four buttons: scan, up and down (for controlling Bluetooth connections and remotely activating soft keyboards), and a delete key. Customizable features available include, a vibrating option and an optional backup battery for the real time clock. The scanner is certified by Apple for use with iOS devices, as well as, compatible with Android, Blackberry, Mac, and Windows devices

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Zoom Room Improves Customer Service with Apple iPad and Socket Barcode Scanners

Posted November 28, 2012

Every type of business is concerned with providing the best possible experience for their customers and taking advantage of new technology tools is a great way to do so. Utilizing mobile devices like the Apple iPad and Socket Bluetooth scanners can make any application more efficient and customer friendly.

Zoom Room, a chain of dog agility training centers, delivers top-notch customer service for canines and humans alike with the Apple iPad and CHS Series 7 barcode scanners from Socket Mobile. The mobile technology enables employees to spend more time helping customers, perform transactions and registrations away from the front desk, and minimize paper usage to support corporate green initiatives.

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Shadow QR Code Campaign Increases Sales 25%

Posted June 11, 2012

Many retailers experience a slow part of the day which can be a difficult challenge to solve.  Sometimes the best answer is engaging your customers in new and creative ways.

South Korea’s largest retailer, E-mart, was seeing a a large dip in daily business from 12pm to 1pm and came up with a novel way to get customers into stores.  They created a shadow QR code that was only scannable between 12pm and 1pm when the sun was in a position to cast the correct shape shadow.  When people would see these shadow QR codes outdoors they could use their smartphone to read them.  Once scanned, they are lead to a ‘Sunny Sale’ homepage with special offers, coupons and a download for the Emart ecommerce app.  This simple yet clever campaign helped increase Emart’s sale by 25% during their once difficult lunchtime slump. The campaign was conceived and managed by Cheil Worldwide who were also responsible for the virtual grocery store in Hangangjin subway station in Seoul.

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Barcode Scanning on Google Product Search

Posted May 18, 2009

scan-barcode[1]Great Barcode Scanning applications are already on the Android Market – nod to ShopSavvy – but Google has just added that function to their own stable of services within Google Product Search. A post published on the Official Google Mobile Blog highlights the addition.

Google Shopping suffers from the same issues as apps like ShopSavvy – it usually only works with certain types of products and Google acknowledges this:

Today, barcode scanning works best for products like electronics, books, movies or video games, but we’re working on adding more barcodes for other items. Of course, if your scan does not return a result, you can always type in the product name just as before.

This is pretty awesome if you ask me and an obvious next step for Google. Although I feel kind of bad for ShopSavvy who seem to be getting cornered out of the market, everything is free game and I’m sure that ShopSavvy will have its fair share of users stick around.

It is interesting to note that Jeffrey Sharkey, an Android Developer Challenge 1 Winner, was the developer behind a barcode scanning/shopping application called Compare Everywhere and he is now a Google employee working on the Google Android Team. However, he didn’t know about this new feature until I told him! Jeffrey informed me that he has been extremely busy with other fun stuff like widgets, for example.

Be warned, this is only available in the US and UK on Android Phones.

(Original article:

Barcoding Billboards to Save Homeless Critters

Posted April 23, 2009

Toronto-based has integrated photo-enabled barcode technology into its wildlife protection OOH campaign. The eye-catching billboards featuring wild animals marooned in city settings were launched two weeks ago around Toronto.

One of the billboards in the campaign features Microsoft’s Tag High Capacity Colour Barcode (HCCB) technology, which gives smartphone users direct access to the organization’s website by snapping a picture of the barcode on the billboard, which is located at Eglinton Avenue and Markham Road in Toronto. is a philanthropic enterprise of Toronto agency Holmes & Lee that helps nonprofits raise money in a cost-effective manner, so more funds go directly to the causes. The general website links users to six different charities and non-profits pertaining to wildlife, giving a platform for concerned individuals to start informing themselves on the issue.

“We aggregate for different charities that happen to operate in the same space, in this case it is wildlife protection,” Peter Holmes, president of Holmes & Lee, tells MiC.

Barcode scanning with the new iPhone?

Posted April 22, 2009

Barcode scanning with the iPhone?

When iPhone 3.0 comes out later this year, we’ll see iPhone apps tied to special-purpose accessories.

Imagine a universal remote that lets you use your iPhone to control every box in your home-entertainment system. Or a portable RFID- and barcode-scanning module that turns your iPhone into a tiny store clerk — or comparison shopper — letting you find and buy stuff just by waving your phone at it.

These are just two suggestions from readers for accessory-powered iPhone 3.0 applications — or, to use the term we coined, dongleware. We put up a call for suggestions, and you responded with loads of great ideas. We figured, what better way to give wannabe-millionaire developers ideas — and get what consumers want in return? Win-win.

iPhone 3.0 won’t be launching until summer, but developers can get plenty done in two or three months. To help speed up the process, here are your top-voted ideas in a nice and tidy list. Drum roll, please.

Barcode/RFID/Magnetic-Stripe Reader
This idea got the most votes — an accessory that acts as a barcode scanner and maybe triples as a magnetic-card and RFID tag reader.

Here’s how it could be useful: It would essentially turn the iPhone into a miniature checkout stand. The barcode scanner would register a product’s price, and then customers can simply swipe their credit card into the magnetic card reader. Similarly, the radio-frequency identifier would scan products containing RFID tags, such as library books, and send that information to the iPhone. In theory, the iPhone app transfers the data via the internet to complete the transaction.

Wouldn’t it be interesting (and a little weird) to see iPhones or iPod Touches at the checkout counter of every store?

This could also make a great tool for consumers to do on-the-fly comparison shopping while they browse brick-and-mortar stores.

Nokia launches beta of ‘Point & Find’ system for mobile phones, letting consumers scan images for search with their camera phone.

Posted April 3, 2009

Nokia has launched a beta of its new Point & Find system, which lets mobile phone users search for information on an object by looking at it with their handset camera.

While the service could eventually let consumers scan barcodes, at the moment Point & Find is focused on movies.

Philipp Schloter, Nokia’s general manager for Point & Find, explained: “Simply by pointing their camera phone at a poster for a new movie, people can watch the trailer, read reviews, and find the closest cinema where it is playing.”

Other uses suggested by Nokia include scanning barcodes for prices, looking at items for sale and being sent more details on where to shop or coupons, or eyeing objects in a museum and being sent multimedia information about it.

The open platform system uses the camera to look at images, GPS positioning to decide where it is, and the internet to search though a database of tagged objects. When an image is recognized, links to content – such as film times or prices – are sent back to the user.

Nokia doesn’t just want consumer feedback, but is looking to hear from businesses about their ideas for the tech – click here for the Point & Find business site. It’s already being used by the Body Worlds exhibition at the O2 in London, so pointing the camera of a Point & Find phone at related advertising should bring up data on the show.

The service can currently be downloaded in the US and the UK, on selected handsets. The phones supported by the current beta are the Nokia N82, N95, E66, N81, N76, E51, 6290, 6124 Classic, 6121 Classic, 6110 Navigator, and the 5700 Xpress Music.